A face only a mother could love?

 In Appeal

Greetings!

In desperate need of a dentist, warthogs with their knobby warts and protruding teeth are one of the more fascinating animals in the African savannah. They have won the hearts of anyone who has either seen a Disney movie, or has been fortunate to see them in the wild.

To avoid predators, many warthog burrow at night in the culverts under roads like in the photo opposite. These culverts are connected to drainage systems throughout the town and, because of recent heavy rains in Victoria Falls, two warthog piglets were recently washed down a drainage system.

A young man in town found and rescued them. Together with some of his family members, he tried long and hard to locate the mother to reunite the piglets but was not successful.

This good samaratin cared for the two babies for two days before bringing them in. They weren’t eating very well and struggled the first few days. We tried to feed them our normal baby formula for pigs by syringe but they weren’t thriving.

Assuming stress was making the piglets anxious, we decided to do a more hands-off approach and offer them a Pronutro cereal base mixed with cow’s milk. We are thrilled to report that they are now feeding well out of a saucer.

So why go to all this trouble for two little warthogs? Well, warthog are snared by poachers for bush meat and killed by farmers because of crop-raiding. They’re also delicious to eat if you’re a cheetah, leopard, wild dog or lion. (Even our lager eagles will swoop down for a little piglet.)

So, although they’re capable of putting up a fight with those tusks and attitude and are highly adaptable to living in all sorts of conditions, there’s a lot of pressure on warthogs.

Your tax-deductible, year-end support will allow us to carry on protecting warthogs. Whether removing snares or rehabilitating injured animals at the hand of man, a significant amount of our efforts are directed towards this species. Just $100 today will ensure that a snared warthog is rescued and saved – $150 will feed these two little guys for a month. Please consider a donation today. No gift is too small or too large. But please give.

For Wild Africa,
Jessica Dawson
Executive Director